Why Choose Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE)?

Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) is an increasingly popular approach to manage the development of complex systems. A system model is a live representation of a system or product, which allows for simulation of behaviors as well as full traceability from requirement to validated solution. This approach allows engineering teams to iterate faster and to respond more quickly to changing requirements.

Enhanced Communication

MBSE provides a common language for interdisciplinary communication between stakeholders, improving the collective understanding of your system’s requirements, design, and behavior.

Increased Efficiency

Analyze and optimize your system’s behavior and performance before building it. With virtual models, engineers can simulate various scenarios and test different design options without incurring the costs associated with building and testing physical prototypes.

Better Decision Making

By modeling the system’s behavior and performance, engineers can better evaluate the impact of design decisions on the system. This enables better-informed decisions that consider the entire system’s lifecycle, rather than just individual components or subsystems.

Identifying Issues

By modeling the system and its interactions, potential problems can be identified earlier in the development lifecycle, reducing the risk of costly errors and rework later on.

How Does Model-Based Systems Engineering Work?

MBSE is a methodology for Systems Engineering that uses models to manage system complexity. It provides a way to represent different points of view on a system in a structured way. By separating logical and physical aspects of the model, MBSE helps manage system complexity. This allows users to see how top-level concepts and components decompose to lower-level features. It also allows for system analysis, dependency matrices, simulations, and views of the system for every stakeholder. If a change is made to one part of the model, the impact on other parts can easily be discovered. There are four quadrants in MBSE, each with a specific focus.

Operational Logic

The first quadrant is Operational Logic. It represents the perspective of users, operators, and businesspeople. It describes business processes, objectives, organizational structure, use cases, and information flows. It includes both the current state of the system ("the world as-is") and the future state. This quadrant helps ensure that the system meets the needs of its users.

System Logic

The second quadrant is System Logic. It represents the solution to the problem posed in Operational Logic. It describes the behavior of the system, its structure, dataflows between components, and allocation of functionality. It includes alternatives and analyses of them. This quadrant helps ensure that the system meets its objectives.

Physical Operations

The third quadrant is Physical Operations. It represents the physical operations that the system will perform. It describes how the system will interact with the environment, such as sensors, actuators, and control systems. This quadrant helps ensure that the system performs its intended functions.

Physical System

The fourth quadrant is the Physical System. It represents the physical components of the system, such as hardware, software, and interfaces. It shows how the system will be deployed in the real world. This quadrant helps ensure that the system is implementable and maintainable.

Operational Logic

The first quadrant is Operational Logic. It represents the perspective of users, operators, and businesspeople. It describes business processes, objectives, organizational structure, use cases, and information flows. It includes both the current state of the system ("the world as-is") and the future state. This quadrant helps ensure that the system meets the needs of its users.

System Logic

The second quadrant is System Logic. It represents the solution to the problem posed in Operational Logic. It describes the behavior of the system, its structure, dataflows between components, and allocation of functionality. It includes alternatives and analyses of them. This quadrant helps ensure that the system meets its objectives.

Physical Operations

The third quadrant is Physical Operations. It represents the physical operations that the system will perform. It describes how the system will interact with the environment, such as sensors, actuators, and control systems. This quadrant helps ensure that the system performs its intended functions.

Physical System

The fourth quadrant is the Physical System. It represents the physical components of the system, such as hardware, software, and interfaces. It shows how the system will be deployed in the real world. This quadrant helps ensure that the system is implementable and maintainable.

 

Figure 1: Modeling Approach – The Four Quadrants of the MBSE Model

How Can We Help with Your Systems Engineering Strategy?

MBSE is a multidisciplinary and multifaceted endeavor. It requires its own actors, processes, environment, and information flows. To create a successful model of a complex system or system of systems, the organization must support the modelling process. We help you get started on your MBSE journey until you reap all the short-term and long-term benefits of its implementation.

MBSE Consulting

MBSE is more than a buzzword, it provides a means to optimize stakeholder requirements and coordinate system development activity. Building a systems architecture will reduce your time to market by quickly crystallizing the stakeholder requirements and streamlining the detailed design, analysis, and testing. These solutions provide:

  • Dynamics visual insights
  • Enterprise risk mitigation
  • Elimination of operational pain points

MBSE Solutions

We provide several MBSE solutions which can help you to:

  • Improve your product development processes by creating and sharing digital models of your products, which can help you to identify and resolve design issues early on.
  • Reduce your product development costs by automating many of the manual tasks involved in product development, which can save you time and money.
  • Improve your product quality by ensuring that your products are designed to meet all of your requirements, which can help to reduce the number of defects in your products.

MBSE Services

We provide a range of MBSE services, including:

  • Systems engineering consulting: We can help you to develop a systems engineering plan for your project, and to select the right MBSE tools and technologies.
  • Software installation and configuration: We can install and configure CATIA Magic and No Magic software on your servers, and we can train your staff on how to use the software.
  • Software maintenance and support: We can provide ongoing maintenance and support for your CATIA Magic and No Magic software, including bug fixes and security updates.

MBSE Training

To be successful in model-based systems engineering (MBSE), you need a methodology, a language, and a tool.

  • Methodology: A methodology is a set of processes and guidelines that help you to plan, execute, and control your MBSE project
  • Language: A modeling language is a set of symbols and graphical notations that you use to create models of your system
  • Tool: A modeling tool is a software application that helps you to create, edit, and manage your models

Our certified training courses cover all user requirements from beginners to advanced and custom use cases.

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